It’s very common for riders all over the country to put their motorcycles up for the winter. Between cold weather, unpredictable precipitation, and less-than-ideal roadways in the winter, it’s not very practical to ride around town. In fact, unless you are fortunate enough to live in a part of the nation that has mild weather all year round, you just may not find rinding around comfortable. In some places, like here in Las Vegas where BBV is located, that may have meant putting your bike away for a month. In other parts of the country, that could be as many as three or four months! That’s a long time, especially if you haven’t kept up your motorcycle maintenance. So let’s focus on getting your motorcycle ready for spring! Try these post-storage bike tips from BBV Power Sports.

Check the Tires

One of the first things that you need to inspect on your motorcycle after a long winter hibernation is the tires— because of safety first, right! The cold air has a way of naturally deflating your tires and when you couple that with a few months of inactivity in your garage or storage shed, you’ll find that your motorcycle will be unrideable.

Change the Fuel

It’s usually a good idea to use as much fuel as you before storing your motorcycle for the winter because you will have to change the fuel after storing it. Generally speaking, fuel can sit for a while before going bad. But old fuel can bog down your engine as it fuel degrades. When a bike has been sitting for a while and you need to get it running again, you will likely need to clean out the fuel system.

Check the Battery

If you want to start your motorcycle up after a long winter you will most likely need to change the fuel and the battery. As with all electronics, the battery on your motorcycle will need to be replaced if you have not used it in a long while. If you put your bike away for the winter, the chances are that winter in your area is likely too cold to ride. The cold combined with a month or more of inactivity can leave your battery weak— if it even starts at all.

Oil Change

As a hard-fast rule of thumb, it’s a good idea to have your bike fully serviced after a long storage period. Changing all of the fluids like gas and oil will keep your motorcycle running smoothly all spring. Changing your motor oil also depends on how many miles you have ridden with the current oil but if you are unsure you after a few months, it’s best to change it to prevent mechanical issues.